Other insects and springtails in the garden


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                                                                          Other insects and springtails in the garden     

 

Here a few interesting insects, which don't belong to the other insects on this site and some springtails. 

Grasshoppers

I don't see many species of grasshoppers in the garden.  

Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Female. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae).  Photos August 2010.

As you can see in the pictures, there is a clear difference between males and females of this light green grasshopper. The small ovipositor of the females curves upwards. The forewings are too small to fly.
Similar species are Barbitistes serricauda (larger) and the leptophyes albovittata (white stripes along the flanks)     
The sound they make is too high for human ears. 
Males 10 - 13 mm, females 13- 18 mm. Across most of Europe. June - October.

Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Female. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). Speckled bush-criket ( (Leptophyes punctatissima). Female.

 

Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Male. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). Speckled bush-criket (Leptophyes punctatissima). Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae).  Photos August 2010.

Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Male. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). Speckled bush-criket  (Leptophyes punctatissima). Male.

The nymphs of the Speckled bush-crikets are speckled black and have black bands on the antennae and legs. Photo1-6-2013. The nymphs of the Speckled bush-crikets are speckled black and have black bands on the antennae and legs.

 

Southern oak bush cricket (Meconema meridionale). Subfamily Meconematinae. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). Southern oak bush cricket (Meconema meridionale). Subfamily Meconematinae. Family bush-criket (Tettigoniidae). 

A light green grasshopper with a clear light yellow stripe from head to the backside of the body. The wings are very small. They don't fly. and don't jump. The male has a thread-like cerci. The female has a fairly long sword-shaped ovipositor.
It is a southern European species., most probably together with garden plants in the Netherlands ended. They can also tails with holidaymakers. Maybe Cheilosia caerulescens is spread by the sale of southern European garden plants. Or in the luggage of holidaymakers.
It feeds on small insects like aphids.

Males 11 - 13 mm, females 11 - 16 mm. August - November.

Photo female 17-10-2010. 

 

Lesser Marsh Grasshopper (Chorthippus albomarginatus). Family Acrididae. Lesser Marsh Grasshopper (Chorthippus albomarginatus). Family Acrididae.

The "pronotal side-keels" and the bars of the Lesser Marsh Grasshopper are approximately parallel. It has long wings totally pale legs. The colour is variable from green to brown. It looks like the C. montanus and the Meadow grasshopper (C. parallelus), but these grasshoppers have a dark hind knee and usually shorter wings. The C. dorsatus is also similar, but is very rare in the Netherlands.) 

Length 13 - 23 mm.
June - September.

Lesser Marsh Grasshopper (Chorthippus albomarginatus). Family Acrididae. Photos 9-8-2013.  

Common Field Grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus). Family Acrididae. Common Field Grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus). Family Acrididae.

The common field grasshopper is brown in colour. The pronotum is paler.
The three species common field grasshopper, bow-winged grasshopper (Chorthippus biguttulus) and Chorthippus mollis are very similar to each other. The males are easy to identify by sound. The females of the threes species are very difficult to identify.
Europe. In the Netherlands, a very common grasshopper.
Length males from 12 to 17 mm and females 18 to 25 mm.
May - September.

Common Field Grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus). Family Acrididae. Photos 20-7-2014. German: Verkannter Grashüpfer. French: Criquet duettiste.

Chorthippus biguttulus-group. Family Acrididae. Female. Common field grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus), bow-winged grasshopper (Chorthippus biguttulus) and Chorthippus mollis  Chorthippus biguttulus-group. Female. Family Acrididae.

This is the female sitting on the terrace and which can not be determined.
So: Common field grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus), bow-winged grasshopper (Chorthippus biguttulus) and Chorthippus mollis  

Chorthippus biguttulus-group. Family Acrididae. Female. Common field grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus), bow-winged grasshopper (Chorthippus biguttulus) and Chorthippus mollis  Photos 11-9-2015.  

Slender Ground-hopper, slender Grouse Locust (Tetrix subulata). Subfamily Tetriginae. Family groundhoppers, pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae).

Slender Ground-hopper, slender Grouse Locust (Tetrix subulata). Subfamily Tetriginae. Family groundhoppers, pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae).

In 2015,for the first time in our garden.

The slender ground-hopper mainly feed on algae, mosses and lichens, but also on grasses. They have a preference for humid areas.
Length: about 10-15 mm. March - September Europe, North Africa. 

Photo 9-5-2015.                                                                                            
German: Säbel-Dornschrecke. French: Le Tétrix riverain.

Grasshoppers photographed in the dunes.

Blue-winged grasshopper (Oedipoda caerulescens). Subfamily Oedipodinae. Family Acrididae. Blue-winged grasshopper (Oedipoda caerulescens). Subfamily Oedipodinae. Family Acrididae.

A brown grasshopper with pale brown spots. Mostly with pale and dark bands around the legs. It is well camouflaged. Very characteristic is the blue turquoise colour of the hind wings, but this is only visible in flight. At rest, it looks like the red-winged grasshopper (Oedipoda germanica), which of course has red wings. He eats mainly grass.
In the Netherlands, in sandy areas, such as the dunes. Abroad also in other areas such as limestone soils, gravel plains. Never bushy places. The body coloration of the grasshoppers in these areas varies depending on the substrate on which the animals have developed. 
June - October
Length females 20-29 mm, males 13-23 mm.  
Photo 10-10-2014.

Cepero's groundhopper (Tetrix ceperoi). Subfamily Tetriginae. Family groundhoppers, pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae).

Cepero's groundhopper (Tetrix ceperoi). Subfamily Tetriginae. Family groundhoppers, pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae).

The Cepero's groundhopper is variable in colour. From brown to green. It looks like the species of the Slender Groundhopper (Tetrix subulata). However, the antennas are closer together.
Especially in humid sandy soils with clearings, where it feeds on algae. March - September
Length females 11-13 mm, males from 9.5 to 10.5 mm.

Photo 10-3-2014.

Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

In the Netherlands  are  177 species. The larvae prevent in the water and build a cocoon using materials such as silk, silt, small fragments of rock, sand, small pieces of twig, aquatic plants. I see them  oft  in the pond.
Each species has its own kind of cocoon. When the Caddisfly is ready to go into metamorphosis, it will seal itself inside it's cocoon. It emerges in four weeks as a pre-adult.  Then it will swim out of the water and shed one more skin before it's wings will be fully formed, and it's able to fly away.
Most adults are non-feeding. The female caddisfly will often lay eggs (enclosed in a gelatinous mass) by attaching them to the plants of the pond above or below the water surface.
Most species have long antennae.

Glyphotaelius pellucidus. FamiliyLimnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

Glyphotaelius pellucidus. FamiliyLimnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

Glyphotaelius pellucidus. FamiliyLimnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

Caddisflies It is a Glyphotaelius pellucidus. FamiliyLimnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

Glyphotaelius pellucidus. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

This is a common species in Holland and is to recognize because of the notched outside edge of the marbled forewing. 
Length 12-17 mm.
April - June and August - October
Palearctic. Photos 28-08-2007.

Cocoon of a Caddisfly, Trichoptera. Cocoon of a Caddisfly, Trichoptera. In our pond. Photo 10-6-2012.





Limnephilus flavicornis. Familie schietmotten (Limnephilidae). Orde schietmotten, kokerjuffers (Trichoptera). Limnephilus flavicornis. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

A tan Caddisfly. On the wings are pale gray-brown with darker spots. 

Length 11 - 17 mm. May - October.

Photos 6-7-2015.

 

 



Limnephilus marmoratus. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

Limnephilus marmoratus. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). Limnephilus marmoratus. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

The wings are more strongly marked than the Limnephilus flavicornis. At night they are attracted to light.

Length 12 - 17 mm. 

Photos 22-7-2015.

 

Oecetis ochracea. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).
Oecetis ochracea. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). Oecetis ochracea. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera).

A general pale brown caddis. On the wings no pattern. At night they are attracted to light.
Palearctic and Nearctic
Photos 8-7-2013.

 

 

Caddisflies photographed in the dunes.

Anabolia nervosa. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

Anabolia nervosa. Familiy Limnephilidae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

Both the body and the wings of this caddisfly are pale brown. On the wings some pale small spots, but no distinctive markings.
The most species in September October
They have a preference for sand. The larvae also use sand grains to build their cases. Small sticks are also attached to the cases. The larvae feed on algae and small insects. 
Length 11 - 15 mm.

Photo 18-10-2013.

Mystacides azureus. Subfamily Leptocerinae. Familiy Leptoceridae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

Mystacides azureus. Subfamily Leptocerinae. Familiy Leptoceridae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

The wings of this caddisfly are blue-black and it has red eyes. The antennae are very long and thin. Large palps.
The larvae live in the water of plant material and sometimes small water animals. The larva overwinters.
Length 6-7 mm. Palearctic.
May - October. Probably two generations.

Photo 29-6-2013.  

Mystacides longicornis. Subfamily Leptocerinae. Familiy Leptoceridae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

Mystacides longicornis. Subfamily Leptocerinae. Familiy Leptoceridae. Order Caddisflies (Trichoptera). 

The wings are yellowish brown with three dark brown cross bands. The antennas are long. The male has large palps.
The larvae live in the water of plant material and sometimes small water animals. The larva overwinters. The case is covered with sand grains.
Length to 9 mm. Palearctic.

Photo 29-6-2013.


Family alderflies (Sialidae).


Alderfly (Sialis cf. lutaria). Family alderflies (Sialidae) Order Megaloptera.

Alderfly (Sialis cf. lutaria). Family alderflies (Sialidae) Order Megaloptera. Alderfly (Sialis cf. lutaria). Family alderflies (Sialidae). Order Megaloptera.

A dark brown insect with large wings, which are folded at rest like a roof over the body. The veins in the wings are very clearly. Despite the name it isn't a fly. It has four wings.
cf means likely. Because from photos it is not to be distinguished from other species. This is the most common alder fly. The eggs are deposited on plants near the water. The larvae fall into the water. These aquatic predators live on the bottom and feed on for example insect larvae.
Sialis lutaria is found in still or slow-flowing water. Sialis fuliginosais especially in fast-flowing water, Sialis nigripes near large rivers and Sialis flavilatera in muddy, stagnant water. In Europe, there are six known species.
Length 35 mm. May - August.

Photos 3-5-2013.

Family Chrysopidae, Hemerobiidae.

 

Green lacewing  (Chrysoperla carnea). Family Chrysopidae. Order Neuroptera

Green lacewing  (Chrysoperla carnea). Family Chrysopidae. Order Neuroptera.

Green lacewing  (Chrysoperla carnea). Family Chrysopidae. Order Neuroptera.

Green lacewing  (Chrysoperla carnea). Family Chrysopidae. Order Neuroptera. Green lacewing  (Chrysoperla carnea). Family Chrysopidae. Order Neuroptera.

There are many species lacewings. Some species are very similar.
The four transparent wings are in rest folded like a little roof. It has large golden eyes. A general species in the Netherlands.
The eggs are laid at the tip of long stalks on the surface of leaves. The larvae feed on aphids, while adult animals also feed on nectar. It is a night animal.
In the greenhouses they are used against aphids. Larvae of some species are camouflaged with pieces of plants or dead aphids. An example.
Two generations in a year. The adult overwinters and turns in a brownish pink colour. The larva on this photo is perhaps of an other species.
Length: 10 - 17 mm.
German: Gemeine Florfliege oder Grüne Florfliege   French: Chrysope verte

 larva lacewing  larva lacewing  A camouflaged lacewing larva.  A camouflaged lacewing larva.  



 

Wesmaelius spec. Family brown lacewings (Hemerobiidae). Order Neuroptera. Wikipedia: Brown lacewings (Hemerobiidae) differ from the somewhat similar Chrysopidae (green lacewings) not only by the usual colouring but by the wing venation: hemerobiids having numerous long veins lacking in chrysopids. Some of the costal cross veins are forked, unlike in green lacewings. Imagines of subfamily Drepanepteryginae mimic dead leaves. Hemerobiid larvae are usually less hairy than chrysopid larvae.

Wesmaelius spec. Family brown lacewings (Hemerobiidae). Order Neuroptera.

A small brown lacewing with striking wing pattern. There are some quite similar species.
Photo 5-7-2014.


Larve van een dwerggaasvlieg uit de familie dwerggaasvliegen (Coniopterygidae).

Larva

Een dwerggaasvlieg uit de familie dwerggaasvliegen (Coniopterygidae). A dustywing from the family dustywings (Coniopterygidae). Order Neuroptera.

A small white gauze fly. There are fewer veins on the wings compared to other net-winged insects. They are covered with a whitish or gray powder was secreted by glands located in the head, chest and abdomen. The larvae and adult dwarf lacewings feed on small prey like aphids, scale insects and Acarina.
In the Netherlands there are five genera with twelve species. from a photo they are not to identify.
Genus Aleuropteryx: Aleuropteryx loewii.
Genus Coniopteryx C. borealis, C. esbenpeterseni, C. pygmaea, C. tineiformis, C. tjederi.
Genus Conwentzia C. pineticola, C.psociformis.
Genus Helicoconis: Helicoconis lutea.
Genus Parasemidalis: Parasemidalis fuscipennis.
Genus Semidalis S. aleyrodiformis, S. aleyrodiformis.

Photos 17-10-2016, 30-10-2016.

Family Baetidae.

Mayflies have two or three tails at the end of the body. The nymphs live about one year. The adults live much shorter.
Mayflies moult for the last time, when they have wings already. The adults eat no more.
The nymphs of the different species of mayflies live in the water or in the boggy soil.

Haft, ééndagsvlieg, Cloeon dipterum. Familie Baetidae Mayfly, Cloeon dipterum. Family Baetidae.

Very common, often in ponds, where the larvae feed on algae.
Like other members of the genus Cloeon and Procloeon Cloeon dipterum has no rear wings (like other species), and two has two tails. The eyes of the males have an additional dorsal "turban-shaped" parts that function as superposition eyes.
May - October. Palearctic and Nearctic.
Photo female 4-7-2011.

 

Scorpion fly (Panorpa). Family scorpionflies (Panorpidae). Order Mecoptera.

They have four wings.
The common scorpion flies do not like the sun. They are found on vegetation in damp, shaded places as hedgerows. (Panorpa vulgaris likes shaded and sunny places) They feed mainly dead insects, but they eat also insects like aphids, rotting fruit.
The name scorpion it has got, because
the shape of the male genitalia, which is held forward above the abdomen like a scorpion's stinger  During the mating the female of the male gets a drop of saliva.
Eggs are laid in soil. The larvae (caterpillar-like) live in the leaflitter. There is one generation a year.
Length: about 15 mm.  
German: Schnabelfliegen, Schnabelhafte  French: Mécoptères.

In 2009 I have taken more photos. Arp Kruithof has determined these scorpion flies. Thanks Arp.
Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Female. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Female. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae).

   
Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Female. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Female. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Photos 29-4-2009.

Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae).

 
Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae).  Photos 9-4-2009.

Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa germanica. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Photos 22-4-2009.

Scorpion fly, Panorpa vulgaris. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae). Scorpion fly, Panorpa vulgaris. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae).

 
Scorpion fly, Panorpa vulgaris. Male. Family scorpion flies (Panorpidae).
Photos 13-6-2009.

Thrips (Thysanoptera)

Trips spec, Thrips spec. Orde Tripsen (Thysanoptera). Ook wel  Onweersbeestjes of Donderbeestjes genoemd. Thrips spec. Order Trips (Thysanoptera).

The order Thrips consists of several families. They are very small, slender insects from 0.5 to 5 mm.
Some thrips suck out plant juices and are considered harmful. Others feed on juices of insects like mites or of molds. There are many species. The thrips on the picture dob't have wings. It was about 3 mm. There are wingless and winged thrips. They can not fly well with the fringed wings. (thysanos: fringed and Pteron: wing). But they can be carried high and far by the wind.
On this picture you can see that the females have an ovipositor. These trips was sitting with other thrips on a log.
Photo 20-7-2012.

A nymph of a Flower bug (Orius spec) 5th instar with its prey, a thrips. A nymph of a Flower bug (Orius spec) 5th instar with its prey, a thrips.   Photo 21-7-2012.  

Springtails (Collembola). 

If you're working in the garden, you'll see all kind of insects spring away. Most of them are springtails. They are useful, because they feed on fungi and decaying organic matter.
They are often about one mm. In any case less than 6 mm. They have a "forked tail" (furcula), under their abdomen. This "tail" can be used for jumping by releasing it. Springtails are sometimes called insects, but they belong to a separate group. So they are no insects. They have six legs.
There are two forms. Globular and elongated. I have some photos, but there are much more species. A great site with much information about springtails is the site of
Frans Janssens. There is also information about springtails on the site of Jan van Duinen (in Dutch)..
Matty Berg, Jan van Duinen and Frans Janssens... thanks for the help by the determination! 

Globular springtails:

Dicyrtomina saundersi. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class (Collembola).  Dicyrtomina saundersi. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class springtails (Collembola). 

Dicyrtomina saundersi is characterised by an antenna in which the colour distinctly changes at the joint of the 2nd to 3rd antennal segment from pale to dark. More pale specimens, the antennae may look 2-coloured. The first part of the antennae of darker spingtails isn't pale but also dark. Look at the photo to the right. At the posterior end of the abdomen it has a spot with a distinctive pattern. (multi-barred cross) The bottom left of the first picture: juvenile Vertagopus arboreus. 

Dicyrtomina saundersi. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class (Collembola).   Dicyrtomina saundersi. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class (Collembola).   Photo's 7-3-2011, 3-2-2014. Thanks Frans Janssens.

Dicyrtomina ornata. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class (Collembola).  Dicyrtomina ornata. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class springtails (Collembola). 

This springtail is similar to the D. saundersi. But the antennas have one colour. More pale specimens, the antennae may look 2-coloured. At the posterior end of the abdomen it has also a spot. But not with such a distinctive pattern. The lower springtail is a pale Dicyrtoma fusca. Photos 7-3-2011.

Dicyrtomina ornata. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class (Collembola).  Photos 7-3-2011.

Dicyrtoma fusca. Familie Springstaarten (Collembola). Dicyrtoma fusca. Family Dicyrtomidae. Class springtails (Collembola). .

This spring tail is less marked than the other two Dicyrtoma.. They have a short fourth antenna segment. (A characteristic of Dictyrtoma)                                 

Dicyrtoma fusca. Familie Springstaarten (Collembola). Photos 7-3-2011.

Allacma fusca. Family Sminthuridae. Class (Collembola). Allacma fusca. Family Sminthuridae. Class springtails (Collembola).

After rain you can find many Allacma fusca springtails on tree trunks looking for algae. I see them on my small greenhouse. Then are also algae. 

Allacma fusca. Family Sminthuridae. Class (Collembola). Photos 14-8-2012.

Elongated springtails:  

Family Entomobryidae.

Entomobrya albocincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Entomobrya albocincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

About 2 mm. It has a striking white band at the shoulders. On the abdomen you can see a orange band. The end of the abdomen is also orange. 

Entomobrya albocincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Photos 11-3-2012.

 

Entomobrya nivalis. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Entomobrya nivalis. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

It is usually olive green, but it can also be yellow. The springtail in the picture is about 2 mm.

Entomobrya nivalis. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Photos 2-12-2011, 21-3-20112.

Heteromurus major. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Heteromurus major. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). 

About 2 mm. Shiny brown with short antenna segments. At the right antenna is missing a segment. 

Photo 24-2-2017.

Heteromurus nitidus. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Heteromurus nitidus. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). 

It looks like an albino. A little lighter because of the reflection of the sunlight. It also has two red eyes. (just be seen if you enlarge the first photo.) It is recognizable by the divided first antennal segment. On the second picture with a young slug. 

Heteromurus nitidus. Familie Entomobryidae. Klasse springstaarten (Collembola).  Photos 25-02-2012.

Lepidocyrtus violaceus of Lepidocyrtus cyaneus. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Lepidocyrtus violaceus of Lepidocyrtus cyaneus. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

A shiny blue springtail of about 1 - 1,5 mm.  

Photo 17-2-2014.

Orchesella cincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Orchesella cincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

A somewhat larger springtail. This springtail has lost the upper part of the antenna. The other Orchesella cincta is smaller and has less clear marks.

Orchesella cincta. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Photos 7-3-2011. 

Orchesella villosa. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Orchesella villosa. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). 

About 4 mm. With beautiful marks.

Orchesella villosa. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).   Orchesella villosa. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Photos 20-3-2011, 6-1-20112.

Willowsia platani. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Willowsia platani. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

A small springtail. It was walking on the toilet paper. About 3 mm. It was probably on our clothes. It is found in planes. These trees are not near our home. 

Willowsia platani. Family Entomobryidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Photos 17-7-2011.

Family Isotomidae.

Isotoma viridis. Family Isotomidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Isotoma viridis. Family Isotomidae. Class springtails (Collembola).

This springtail is remarkably green and looks like, e.g., Isotomurus prasinus, but they are also darker.

Isotoma viridis. Family Isotomidae. Class springtails (Collembola). Photos 16-2-2014.

Family Tomoceridae.

Tomocerus vulgaris. Family Tomoceridae. Class springtails (Collembola). Tomocerus vulgaris. Family Tomoceridae. Class springtails (Collembola).

About 4 mm and very active. Luckily it did just sit still for the picture. Dark and shiny in the sun. Photos 19-3-2011.
On 12-12-2011 I saw a yellow springtail. It was a Tomocerus vulgaris. This springtail had lost its scales. The light yellow colour is under the scales.   

Tomocerus vulgaris. Family Tomoceridae. Class springtails (Collembola).  Tomocerus vulgaris. Family Tomoceridae. Class springtails (Collembola). Photos 19-3-2011, 12-12-2011.  

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Croatia
 
 

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Subpage flies:   Tachinidae         Blow-flies (Calliphoridae)        House flies (Muscidae)       Soldierflies (Stratiomyidae)       Root-Maggot Flies (Anthomyiidae)        Small flies       Gnats     
Subpage wasps, bees, bumblebees:  Parasitica Parasitica (Ichneumonidae)e        Sawflies (Symphyta)       Bumblebees   Bee hotel 
Subpage beetles:   Ground beetles (Carabidae)        Leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae)  Snout beetles, weevils        Longhorn beetles, similar to longhorn beetles         Ladybirds, Ladybugs (Coccinellidae)        Rove beetles (Staphylinidae)        Small  beetles      
Subpage bugs:  'Water bugs'        True bugs (Pentatomoidea)        Plantbugs (Miridae)      Seed bugs  (Lygaeidae) 
Subpage butterflies, moths:  Butterflies        Atalanta, Red Admiral        Owlet moths        Geometer moths        Leafrollers, tortrix moths       Pyralidae Pyralidae (Crambidae)e        Concealer  moths ((Oecophoridae) 
 Subpage dragonflies:  Southern Hawker, Blue Hawker    Subpage France:   Insects France   



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